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feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 years ago -- things have changed quite a bit. we believe this would bring increased vitality to the neighborhood, increased spending in the city that would help overall -- the overall economy. when we look at the political will, we look at financing options and opportunities to take next that's. the best opportunity is mosconi east in 2008. that would be a perfect time live from what we believe meets the demand that is growing at the moment. the last thing i want to talk about his proposition j, the proposition to increase the hotel tax. it increases it two points, 14%. it just went up 13% two years ago, so we would have a 25% increase in hotel taxes in just a few years. it i
with a mixed use development, which would be a unique public-private partnership. it would be a tremendous opportunity to expand mosconi and improve the neighborhood. it would improve the entrance to the neighborhood on third street. right now, stoney is a very unattractive entry into san francisco -- mosconi is a very unattractive entry into san francisco. the other would be the north-sow 3 configuration, which would require excavating under howard street, which would have done when we first built mosconi south. it would have only cost $3 million. connect north and south and make it one large exhibit space. that would provide the total exhibition space between 500,000 square feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 ye
and figuring out the ways they can use the packing facilities for canning the tomatoes from the local farmer and having the delivery come to the university. and if they can be doing that research on it, then sharing that is a beautiful thing. >> couple of questions, has it been difficult to spread your philosophy to urban communities and what solutions, more specifically, can you offer to help education poor communities and support those students? if money is used as the excuse and easily used in declining resources, how do we realistically break through? >> we start growing things on every available lot. >> i wasn't joking. just think of what happened during world war ii. i grew up on my parent's victory garden. they were asked to do this as a part of the war effort. they saved all of their tin cans. they kept their milk cartons. they turned out the lights. it is the way you were brought up. it is free food when you grow it. every time i see a vacant lot, i think my god, how much food can be grown. there are beautiful people doing research on ecology action with john jevens. how much food c
, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your attitudes toward the automobile have changed. what do you believe
of the school system that works specifically with foster use in san francisco schools. and they have several staff who provided a number of different services. one is a pam let. that one was described to you. these include educational type management. including with special education. they have been able to participate in 100 decision-making meetings last year. those are meetings that take place whenever we look at removal of children. one of the things that we know is that educational success and consistency is very important. they start having educational problems. it request be very demand pg. so they have been able to provide educational at the meeting or they've helped insure that they provide us with the information that we need so that we can assure that the educational needs are getting met. we also on our staff have a child welfare worker who acts as the liaison with the unified school district. they worked with the services staff and the two representatives to have a collaboration. through the part northeast are nership through the foster services. the other brochure that you are i
for us. the mobility plans that local authorities are now obliged to develop, and the hearings that are organized because of that, are almost always concerning parking places. we have now a program where we are having one less car parking space. in the streets, you see, there is one car less because now bicycles can ride their bikes, but the comments are not as enthusiastic. you will have to be from the cycling movement to be happy about that. it is a hard struggle. >> you, sir? >> with health insurance, i think people are realizing it is an idea whose time has come. maybe we're trying to make the same thing with cycling. in the united states, many people, especially in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to take over the streets and will not be room for cars and we will go slower and lose jobs. have you been able to convince people? what kind of arguments
. in a lot of my banners, you conceal -- uc the melting pot, the imagery and myth that we use in our culture. talking about these reductions of all these different mixes of people, how you distill the experience. that is something i want to think about, collecting the ideas and ingredients, and i wanted to do the san francisco de lexie. -- elixir. we found a spring water underneath a church in cow hollow. we put rosebuds in the water to attract peace, and it made a meade. it was sitting in the gallery. we distill that through local herbs. it was really surprising how delicious it was, because we were mixing a lot of seemingly in congruent ingredients, and it was delicious and different from anything you have ever tasted. i would have been happy if it was medicinal. the idea was more important to me. but it was very good. it is something i think a lot about, especially transition history, native americans, how they have this combination of dress, from the clothing from trade companies, mixed with traditional dress. i love how reflective it is of who they are, and also the merging history's co
with the world premiere of three heads, six arms. the artist came from shanghai to help us celebrate the unavailing. we had a chance to speak with him about his work. >> the san francisco arts commission is pleased to be celebrating their relationship between san high and san francisco. the shanghai and san francisco. this is a 30 relationship that stretches back to win dianne feinstein was the mayor of san francisco. we premiered a new work of art here in san francisco called the three heads, six arms. welcome to san francisco. thank you for bringing your extraordinary sculpture. can you tell me about what inspired you to create this sculpture? >> this started with some trips that i took years ago. i went to to bed and i saw a lot of statues and i started to really feel the spiritual life of people in tibet. it really inspires me and i went back to shanghai and i started the creation of this. >> we see that one of the heads of the bullet it is your face. can you talk about the significance of that? -- we see that one of the heads of the buddha is your face. >> i started doing public
>> the freed american hiker sarah shourd speaking out over a year in iranian prison. she will join us to discuss her ordeal and her campaign to free the other hikers, her fiancÉ shane bauer and joshua fattal remain in jail and iran. appalachia rising. over 100 arrested outside the white house protesting mountaintop removal. the israeli navy detained a boat carrying nine jewish activists attempting to break the gaza blockade. israel has resumed some of building in the west bank. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the c.i.a. has drastically increased bombing campaign in the mountains of pakistan in recent weeks. according to the new york times" the cia has launched at let 20 attacks with armed drone aircraft so far in september, the most ever during a single month. according to one pakistani intelligence official, the recent drone attacks of not killed any senior taliban or al qaeda leaders. many senior operatives have already fled the region to escape the c.i.a. drone campaign. mean what come u.s. apac
. >>> best medicine -- teens are using common cough medicines to get high, but tonight, a surprising decision about a possible solution. >>> and top secret -- what we now know was going on in the background in some of the most famous images of the civil rights era. famous images of the civil rights era. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it's always been a huge gulf in american society and in our workforce, especially, what men and women are paid for the same work. tonight, we can report the numbers have moved. though the reason for it isn't good. figures from this year show women earned 83 cents on the dollar compared to what men earn. that's the highest number ever recorded. the bad news is the reason for it. the economy is in such crummy shape, a ton of men have been hard hit and many women in turn have prospered in this economy. still, in terms of women's income and earning power in the u.s., the number represents a victory, a milestone, and it's where we begin tonight with nbc's michelle kosinski. she's in miami beach for us tonight
news. >> good morning. thank you for waking up with us. it's monday, september 20th. i'm pam cook. >> and good morning. i'm dave clark. let's check your morning weather and traffic. >> we had a little cloud cover. now, patchy clouds. and temperatures will rebound slightly. today, a little more sun. but still on the breezy side. 60s, 70s, and mainly a lot of low 80s. now, here's sal. >> steve, on the east shore, traffic is moving well on the macarthur, with no major problems. also, this morning's commute is going to be okay on the 880 southbound. now, let's go back to the desk. >> sal, thank you. we're following several new developments in the pipeline explosion and fire in san bruno. this week, the coroner is expected to update the official death toll to 7. the family recently announced it lost loved ones in that tragedy. [ inaudible ] they were running the pressure above the maximum limit. and the deadly explosion could change how buildings are built near natural gas lines. in the meantime, claudine wong is joining us with the less of closures today. >> reporter: the question eve
states just saying, hey, please help us. help us. help us make this change. >> couple of questions about private funders. has the private and foundations gravitated beyond your foundation, is this an easy sell? >> what we have to do is make these models and make them really good. that is what has happened with the schoolyard. we put a lot of money into one. we have one in new orleans. it is amazing. this has been an idea, not a berkeley or san francisco idea, something that requires a kind of special fill anthropi and what better way to buy food than people that need money in that city? so the farmer's market is helping to supply the school. now the kids are going out into the neighborhood and picking up cans and bottles and examing them, recycling them, making them into art work. it is a beautiful project. and it is a universal idea, as i say, it is not something that we dreamed up. this is the way people have been living since the beginning, buying things from local people. eating them together with the family and friends. we are just coming back to our senses. >> we have talked
. >> thank you for watching. join us for future episodes. you can >> welcome to culturewater. in 2001, the san francisco arts commission and tampa does go public library established an arts master plan for the city soon to be renovated branch library. almost 10 years later, the san francisco arts commission has integrated a collection of vibrant new artworks by bay area artists into five new libraries, and there is more on the way. here is a closer look at some of the projects. >> the branch library improvement program is a bond funded program undertaken by the san francisco public library to upgrade each of the branch libraries throughout the neighborhoods. one of the great benefits of this opportunity is that each of these branches has a unique artwork that has been created specifically for that branch, based on input from people who live near that branch, in the surrounding neighborhood. >> trur- minded. there was a lot of community support for the project. i try to make it about the true hill and its history. they were something that natives used for making houses. the constructio
, everyone, on this labor day. thanks for joining us. good to see you this morning. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. >>> labor day marks the beginning of the traditional push towards election day. this year with the economy working against them, democrats are fighting to retain control of congress. with that as a backdrop, president obama heads to wisconsin today. there a key senate seat and race for governor are hotly contested. tara mergener is in washington with more on that. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. both of these races are very competitive. this week the president will make two speeches aimed at trying to convince voters he can get the economy back on track. president obama will try to convince voters this week that democratic policies are working. >> to heal our economy, we need more than a healthy stock market. we need bustling main streets and a growing, thriving middle class. >> reporter: he'll head to wisconsin today to give a speech about the economy. on wednesday he'll visit cleveland where he'll announce new steps to help small businesses. all along t
for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> uncertainty over the koran- burning. the u.s. pastor says he has not cancelled as plans, he has just put them on hold. the un general assembly calls for dialogue between serbia and kosovo. it could pave the way for the first direct talks in two years. a california judge rules a ban on homosexuals serving openly in the u.s. military is unconstitutional. controversy in the paris says the world of manga crash lands at the palace of versailles. a warm welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in the u.k. and around the world. the u.s. pastor who has been condemned worldwide for his threat to burn copies of the koran on the anniversary of september 11 says his plan is now on hold. terry jones originally announced he was cancelling the event, but now says it is conditional on holding talks with the imam in charge of a planned islamic cultural center near ground zero. mr. jones said he had agreed to move the center in return for his cancelling the koran- burning. the imam denies it. mr. jones now says he was lied to. >> the day began with the white hou
not just pull off? >> they could just pull off. that would be useful. if we found there was not a signal, we could that can read it manually. the meter itself records. that will not change. it would cost money to get us meters modified, to take that feature off. >> what is automated is the reporting, not necessarily the meter. that is the difference, i think. >> i suspect the transmitter is somewhat water -- you know -- what is the word and looking for? >> watertight. water-resistant. >> that is it. >> colleagues, and the questions? ok, hearing and seeing none, any public comment? >> we have one speaker card. commissioner crowley: 90. -- thank you. >> i was almost asleep, but he will bring up when he said good faith effort. we have been talking for the last year-and-a-half. good faith effort does not mean jobs for my people in the community. it is not local hiring. i have heard that word for 40 years. that was when we had redevelopment time for our community, like you had in 1972 the expression of the sewage plant. that word was used. i want you all to delete that
to the 2,752 victims killed when terrorists hijacked four commercial planes that attacked the u.s. in lower manhattan 9/11 families gather at a park adjacent to ground zero. throughout the morning in shanksville, pennsylvania where united 93 flight crashed, michelle obama and laura bush will honor a ceremony to honor the passengers that fought back. plans to rebuild at ground zero are moving forward. the centerpiece, one world trade center, is expected to be completed by 2013, but with each construction step forward, there remains a connection to the past. steel beams pulled from the rubble were permanently installed this week at the entrance of the national september 11th memorial and museum slated to be finished in 2012. >> it is going to be a memorial that we will all be proud of and a memorial that will inspire people around the world. >> and always remind them never to forget. president obama also signed a probleming clamation making september 10th through 12th national days of prayer and remembrance, calling on americans also to set aside time to volunteer. amy. >> and now here's carl
of the government, the current effort in afghanistan and condition of the u.s. economy, all referenced in the president's speech. here is how you can talk to us the first half hour. president obama saying last night it is time to turn the page. your interpretation of that. phone, e-mail, or twitter. again, if you want to give an e- mail, journal@c-span.org and twitter, go to twitter and then c-spanwj. "the washington post" use is that " for its story tonight. turning to "the new york times." and going to "usa today" -- again, the president quote. conn. mary on hours democrats line. caller: good morning, pedro. i wanted to say how proud i am of president obama fulfilling another of his campaign commitments. i wish to the iraqi people well in governing themselves. and i agree with the president that it is time that we concentrates on our economy and what happened to the people in the middle class. i hope he does stand strong on inundating -- eliminating the tax credit that was given to the very wealthy, by discontinuing that at the end of the year. host: raleigh, north carolina. john, re
to people out here and they told us certainly the question of could this happen again weighs on their minds. pg&e is expected to release a list into areas of concern. and certainly people want to see that less. the question is, what are they going to do about that list? and that is still unclear this morning. now, san jose's mayor, chuck reed, said that the intersection of taz min and first is on the list. that's what he's been told by pg&e. and they are on this apparent list that could be released as early as today. but other than that, it doesn't appear the city has gotten much more. the city wants to make this list public. they have already made public areas of fremont, south san francisco, and livermore, that have been deemed high risk. but what this means in terms of an action plan, still not clear. and people we talked to this morning say they are worried. >> i would probably try to avoid those areas that are high risk. because obviously something bad happened once. and it is possible that it could happen in san jose. >> reporter: how much this list will actually tell us when it it is
in the u.s. is reportedly resurfacing. does it mean more attacks? brian ross has the latest on the new threats that have authorities on high alert. >>> true confession. this woman claimed to be the victim of that vicious acid attack. for the first time, we learn why she planned this hoax and burned her own face. >>> and too many wives? police investigate the family in the reality show "sister wives." one man, four women, and 16 children. will going public send the family to court? >>> good morning. >> good morning. 4 wives, 16 kids? >> maybe they should have thought about that before going on tv. >> the show's going to go on, they say. we're going to have that in our next half hour. >>> first, president obama in full campaign mode. call it his glory days tour. he's in iowa and virginia today, two of his key states from 2008. last night he had a huge college rally in wisconsin, trying to target the voters who surged the polls but have been sitting this year out. and the big question is, can he recapture some of that 2008 magic? because this has been the tea party's year. >
that this was important to us. what i've said to prime minister netanyahu is that given so far the talks are moving forward in a constructive way, it makes sense to extend that moratorium so long as the takes are moving in a constructive way. because ultimately the way to solve these problems is for the two sides to agree, what's it going to be, israel? what's it going to be, the state of palestine? and if you can get that agreement, then you can start constructing anything that the people of of israel see fit. now, i think the policies of prime minister netanyahu is very different. there has been a coalition that says, we don't want to continue this. so i've said, you've got to show the israeli public that you are serious and constructive in these talks so that the politics for prime minister netanyahu, if he were going to extend the settlement moratorium, would be a little bit easier. and, you know, one of the goals i think that i've set for myself and for my team is to make sure that president habas and prime minister netanyahu start thinking about, how can they help the other succeed as opposed
connected to it. they will actually embrace it. i think it will be a good thing for all of us. >> if you are walking in the tenderloin, you'll be able to see this piece that is in front of the original [inaudible] which is a restaurant that has a lot of history. there are exciting projects on market streets. there are two gorgeous minerals as well as six different installations. they are making huge figures that they will be able to see. >> there is a definite level of appropriateness of stuff i am using. a lot of businesses died in 2009. >> i think i'm trying to deal with the maximum out of space possible. that is surging right now. everyone is doing what they can with what they have. sometimes that introduces a lot of interesting things. there is nothing that inspires quite like this. >> the project benefits both the property owner, the neighborhood, and the artists, all of whom have been effected by the economic downturn. >> this is brand new work. >> we chose artists that had a diverse array of media from home video to coulter, paintings. >> when people walk around these neighborhood
of using the express lane along 680. $1 that is going to change depending on congestion. here along the highway, between southbound 680, senole grade. 14 miles worth of highway, this is how things will look as you drive through, a half mile before each entrance, toll pricing sign, tolls vary depending on congestion. fact tract trance ponder will fact transponder will be read and you cannot exit until you get to mission. chp officers will be out in full force making sure drivers understand. sergeant cross with the california highway patrol, what do you anticipate as the day goes on? >> we anticipate initially there may be confusion but we will have extra officers working the area to be a visible presence as well as conduct enforcement. we highly recommend that spend an extra 10 minutes, do research as far as ins and outs of these express lanes so you are more comfortable. >> what are you looking for as far as making sure people don't cross the lines? >> yeah, the biggest thing, just have that invisible presence, more officers in the area. we want to ensure it is moving smoothly and a
%. if i may proud independence. -- i'm a proud independent. if you look at our infrastructure, who uses mass transit more -- middle class, lower class, or upper class? i would say is middle or lower. guest: certainly, it depends on where you are. the certainly, the average bus- writer in america has a slightly lower income -- the average bus rider in america has a slightly lower income than the average american household. however, the express between fort worth and dallas, for example, it tends to be middle and upper income the use that. across america, all strata of society use public transportation and depending on where the transit goes and what type of transit it is combined with the market is that they are seeking to reach, it could be of -- it could be either very high income, that is with the commuter rail lines in new york or chicago or san francisco are an example of. it can be no american income americans going back and forth -- it can be middle-class american income going back and forth to work. it is a wide spectrum of people that use public transit. when i give these statis
is a terrorist organization saying anything. >> sean: thanks for being with us. see you tomorrow night. >> greta: this is a fox news alert. a federal judge in california has declared the don't ask/don't tell policy unconstitutional. the judge granted a request for an injunction by the government. the case was filed by the log cabin republicans. the department of justice will have an opportunity to appeal. stay with fox news for the latest on this breaking news. >> this is another fox news alert. video coming into fox news of a massive fire consuming homes in the san bruno area of california near san francisco. firefighters are battling this blaze. right misses report a loud explosion before the flames erupted. we are waiting for details and we will be watching break news throughout the hour. >> tonight it is getting worse, no not the economy. we talking about the democrats. even comedy central's jon stewart is warning democrats. >> we a message between now and november. they drove it into the ditch, don't give 'em the keys back. >> you're in trouble dude. >> that doesn't sound particularly good,
us that this book shows president obama as someone who likes to ask a lot of questions, they say someone who is decisive, and takes a broad view of history, national security and his role, that's from senior administration officials. the book, though, does portray a national security team that is deeply torn over the war in afghanistan. again, white house officials say that the book also shows the president who pushed to get the afghan strategy right. that's from white house officials. jon: some of the early reporting indicates that this book quotes the president in great detail. the white house gave bob woodward all kinds of access. why? >> reporter: and they always do, don't therbgs administration officials, and past presidents? this is his 16th book, the first 15 were best sellers, i mean, he's arguably the most famous journalist in the country. so the idea from an administration's point of view is to talk to bob woodward and try to manage the message, if you will, instead of having unnamed sores do that for the administration. jon: shifting gears, julie, the president's top e
to those of us that pay our bills, informing us that 26 will jeopardize, if passed, our solar in san francisco, since we are supposed to be a green city. i'm just asking -- will you please consider that, and let people know and understand? people who do not attend these meetings do not know about services you provide other than challenging us for the sewage, and i would like to say that, too, while i'm on it. i have been back in my home a year, will be, on the 28 of september, and i would like to say i have been receiving my pg&e bill, and my electricity has been less than $4 a month, and this is because of the solar. people listening in the audience because they see me all the time, and i let them know that i am your ambassador, and i am requesting that everyone get solar because the benefits -- it benefits not only the applicants, but as well as our breathing, our health, and i know we had a concern about those smart meters. there were people at those hearings, and i am afraid, and a lot of people are as well but are getting sick on those smart meters. please get the information on
joins us live with more on what will be on the list. good afternoon, claudine. >> reporter: good afternoon, tori. yes, the p.u.c. made its request on friday and pg&e has this 1:00 press conference scheduled. we're told we get to see that list. the list will be the top 100. you no we have spent -- now we've spent this morning dealing with what will be on that list. this morning, it was a typical scene at tazman and 1st. no one seemed overly concerned about the pipe running underground. but chuck reed says he's already been that that section of pipeline will be on the list. but pg&e didn't give any details as to why. >> we don't know the specific locations of the section. we don't know what they plan to do about it. so we're anxious, like everybody else, about what needs to be done. >> reporter: this is the director sent to pg&e's president. it asks for seven areas of information. eventually they want to know which projects is high priority. and what specific public safety concerns put these projects on the list. it also asks for information on anying section of line 132. s that th
by a deadly fireball. we're getting this eyewitness view of the destruction. and the u.s. military gets animated. why it's ansforming the japanese/american security treaty into a comic book security line. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> happening right now, an american jailed more th a year is on the verge of heading home. a lawyer for sarah shod says she is set to be freed once her half million dollar bond is paid. her family says she's sick and an iranian prosecutor says that g bailed out. tein she'll have to leave behind h h fiance shane bauer and her friend josh fattal t. three have been jailed since july 31 of lastary. allegedly they strayed across iran aqi border into duri a hike. ey are accused in iran of being u.s. spies. the family's website says that sarah has been mostly held in confinement. given hour a day to visit her fiance. she could be hours from freedom but her bail hasn't been posted yet. reza sayah is monitoring the situation. st?t is the la >> reporter: well, the latest according to the lawyer representing sarah shourd is hat she is in iranian custody bec
months ago this week, a top to bottom overhaul of u.s. health care, an overhaul that presidents dating back to teddy roosevelt have contemplated, debated, or attempted. six months ago, it was sign into law by president obama. today as you may have seen live here on cnn, the president talking about provisions of that law that come into force this week. this is the first of that health care bill. it's what the white house calls a patients' bill of rights. he's just about the only democrat who is going to use health and reform in the same sentence because the reason has to do with the calendar. we're 40 days away from the elections where every single house seat and 37 senate seats are up for grabs. voters are split to say the least. 40% of americans favor reform, 56% oppose it. there are some tricks to that poll because the 56% oppose, some oppose because it didn't go far enough. most say it's too liberal, but a sizable chunk says it doesn't go far enough. when we ask which party can handle the issue better, it's a dead heat. all of this forms a backdrop to the president's visit to a fami
to that at 6:00 tonight. until then, thanks for watching us at 5:00. good night. >> couric: tonight, scenes from a nightmare. an entire neighborhood near san francisco explodes in flames after a natural gas pipeline breaks. now rescue teams search the rubble for victims. i'm katie couric in los angeles. also tonight, it just keeps getting stranger. that pastor threatening to burn korans makes an ultimatum and now his daughter says she fears he's gone mad. changing the way cancer cells behave. a revolution in the fight against this deadly disease. and you can make a difference in the battle. join us tonight as we stand up to cancer. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric reporting tonight from los angeles. >> couric: good evening, everyone. we're here at the sony studios for tonight's special stand up to cancer program. we'll have more about that later. but first, our top story. a deadly disaster that wiped out an entire neighborhood here in california. it was just before 6:30 last evening people in the city of san bruno were just sitting down to dinner.
why. that will do it for us. thanks for getting up for a special edition of american morning. head to our blog. we hope you have a wonderful weekend. >> see you back here on monday. the news continues with kyra phillips. >> good morning and thanks. we are going to get right to the breaking news in san bruno, california. the neighborhood fire has been burn for almost 12 hours. natural gas feeding it. that fire is still so intense that crews can't even look for victims yet. at least three people are reported dead. the fire captain expects the numbers to rise. two dozen have been hurt and 100 homes damaged. it started with a ruptured gas line and a huge explosion. a team with the ntsb is headed to see what went wrong. crews and the red cross and doctors, nurses and neighborhoods were turned upside down in a flash. the blast and fire was so sudden and intense, people barely had time to react. one survivor said that the car bumper actually melted as he was racing away. he is talking with survivors. dan? >> we are in the bark parking lot of a parking mall. this is where many of the evacu
of shipping containers. it was important for us that we made this project for the place, of the place. what i mean by that is participants would also used repurchased materials. >> we will be speaking to one of the artists that you selected. what excited you about his idea? >> have many things. first of all, i am a fan of his architecture. because of that creativity, i knew that he could come up with something unique. i love the fact that he was specifically addressing the landscape around here, and it was also about the human interaction with this place. >> what are your expectations with the people coming to presidio habitat? >> we really hope people will come with their family, dogs, and come back a number of times the works will change over the year. the feedback we are getting is you cannot do all of them on one visit. it is really better to come back and have different experiences. >> thank you. i am with mark jensen of jensen architect. he was one of the architects to be chosen to do the presidio habitat. when you heard about this project, what inspired you about that call? >> our insp
. there you go. >>> welcome to "morning joe." great to have you with us. what a day in norm city yesterday. we actually had breakfast with ahmadinejad. you had lunch with warren buffett. i thought it was a bit in politic for you to ask him to come on "morning joe." tell people, you get warren buffett. you're at lunch and what do you say to him? >> he would be more than willing to carve out a three or four-minute segment once a week to just do stock tips. buffett's picks. >> what are you looking at? he's a hungry kid. >> you had breakfast with ahmadinejad. you had lunch with buffett. >> well, he was at the next table. i didn't have lunch with him. >> i had chicken tenders with my daughter. she's three. >> you're better than us, willie. >> that's like every time i'm going around with mika at speeches and she's giving stories. and then we -- i saw yasir arafat and stalin and churchill. >> is that your mika? >> that's all i got. >> your dad ran u.s. foreign policy. my dad ran a little league team in meridian, mississippi. it's fine. willie is snuggaling up to the chicken tenders. >> it's got to be
for joining us. i'm eric thomas. >> i'm kristen sze. governor schwarzenegger will visit the san bruno fire site today direct from his asia trade mission. meantime e-mails received by federal investigators seem to offer no definitive evidence of neighbors smelling gas before the explosion. terry joins us live from san bruno. >> the ntsb investigators are the ones who are going to figure out exactly what happened. talk about the automatic shutoff valve and a number of other things that address those e-mail concerns. let's get to it now. vice chairman christopher hart joins me. thank you for being here. as far as finding out the cause of this explosion, what are the possibilities and what is the process? >> i won't speculate as to what might have caused it but the pieces, three pieces of pipe will be arriving in the washington d.c. metalergy lab tomorrow. in other words, did the give because of fatigue. contraction, did that cause fatigue, like bending a coat hanger back and forth before it broke. could it be corrosion, for example, impact damage from excavation. we'll look at all those cause
. a revolution in the fight against this deadly disease. and you can make a difference in the battle. join us tonight as we stand up to cancer. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric reporting tonight from los angeles. >> couric: good evening, everyone. we're here at the sony studios for tonight's special stand up to cancer program. we'll have more about that later. but first, our top story. a deadly disaster that wiped out an entire neighborhood here in california. it was just before 6:30 last evening people in the city of san bruno were just sitting down to dinner. then suddenly, without warning, a tremendous explosion. a natural gas pipeline ruptured, setting off a fire that burned 15 acres and destroyed 38 homes. 24 hours later, firefighters were still trying to contain the flames, rescue teams were searching for victims, and investigators were looking for answers. san bruno is a city of 41,000 in northern california just south of san francisco. look at this. claremont drive before the explosion, and now claremont drive tonight, in ruins. john blackst
will be able to pay a toll and use the lanes, it is still free for car poolers, these are the fist express lanes to open -- first express lanes to open up in northern california. the proceeds will go towards a feature tolling project. we will keep you updated usually a congested area. hopefully it will relieve some stress for drivers. let's look at your forecast. here is tracy. >> thanks can i anna. coming up, a mixed weekend. even a few showers and sprinkles in the north bay yesterday. sunshine, temperatures warming up. lower 80s fairfield, concord, 79 liver more, oakland, fremont. 78 san jose, the closer you get to the coastline temperatures don't shift so much. vallejo and san raphael, 80s. we will look at more cities across the bay area and take a look what will happen for the first couple days of fall. it officially arrives wednesday. >>> you are sure it didn't get here a couple weeks ago. >> felt like fall all summer long. >> thanks very much. 5:01 a.m. something new in the east bay a new way to avoid traffic jams makes its debut this morning right at this very minute. let's go to an
. >> they'll join us towards the end of the show. in the meantime, we start with the fox news alert because a deadly helicopter crash overnight leaving nine servicemen dead. it's unclear if any of the dead are americans. according to nato, four others were hurt including an american civilian. the crash happened in a province that's a taliban strong hold. the f.b.i. on its way to fort bliss, texas now where a gunman shot two women at a convenience store. the women believed to be clerks are being treated at a local hospital. military police shot the gunman dead. we don't know the identity of the shooter just yet. congress delaying a vote now on a bill to give $7.4 billion to first responders who got sick after the attacks of september 11th. a vote was expected this week but republicans objected to senator harry reid's addition of two amendments including the dream act that provides amnesty to illegal immigrants. those are your headlines. amnesty not to all illegal immigrants but to students who go to college or those who enter the military and here for five years. >> i believe senator hatch c
shourd's release as a humanitarian gesture. he called on the u.s. to respond by releasing eight iranians he says are being held illegally. >> translator: the u.s. government should make a humanitarian gesture. >> reporter: the case further complicated matters between tehran and washington. relations were already strained over the country's nuclear program. just this summer, the u.n. security council imposed its toughest sanctions yet on the country. but ahmadinejad has downplayed the impact. >> translator: we do take take sanctions seriously, but taking it seriously is different from believing that they are effective. >> reporter: the iranian president is expected to face strong opposition while in the u.s. his arrival sparked one protest near central park sunday, with several more planned throughout the week. as for whether that meeting with ahmadinejad will happen, the mothers say they are still waiting for word. terrell, back to you. >> and hopeful, certainly. tara mergener in washington for us this morning. thank you so much. >>> the ruptured bp oil well in the gulf that led to the w
the president? what's with that? joining us live sam young white house correspondent for the hill. some of the democrats in the field running for office seem to be running from the president. >> i think a track meet is a good way to put it. it is every man for himself now. we've seen some of these spending plans from the president, in honor of the nfl season kicking off tonight it is a hail mary from the white house to try and save jobs beginning with democrats in november. >> greta: senator bennet is a perfect example he's running from them. >> he's the first one, one of the first to stand up and say 50 billion dollars in infrastructure spending i can't support that. the bigger question i have isn't whether senator bennet supports, where is harry reid on this? >> greta: where is harry reid on this? >> no idea. where is nancy pelosi. don stewart who works for mitch mcconnell said he would buy lunch to any reporter who could find a statement from a democratic congressman or senator supporting this. he hasn't bought anybody lunch yet. >> greta: with all due respect to the president, a lit
with a member of the u.s. supreme court. justice steven breyer. >>> standing up to bullying in school. what most kids already know and what parents need to know about the problem. >>> and sudden death. a high school ball player's close call in the end zone, and what some are calling the miracle that saved his life. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. there was something about watching all those homes in california incinerated in that natural gas explosion and fire that made people think of their own homes, to see a neighborhood that was thriving just last week, gone today, makes you think twice about the dangers we all live with. in this case, the pipelines and gas mains that crisscross the country and bring energy to american homes. hundreds of thousands of miles of them passing under communities like san bruno, california. we start off just south of san francisco. miguel, good evening. >> reporter: good evening. tonight, the company that owns the ruptured line offered a bp-like fund. $100 million for families affected by the blast, but ton
for. >> reporter: and looking for help, with no idea where to even begin. 77-year-old les is using a shopping cart to get around because he fled without his walker. >> just so hot. >> reporter: and you lived in that home how long? >> 53 years. >> reporter: the pipeline is about as old as this neighborhood, but investigators still don't know why it blew. and why search teams are in there right now looking for more possible victims, investigators from the ntsb are on scene to try to determine exactly what went wrong. diane? >> neal, as you know, that gas pipe was enormous, we're talking 30 inches in diameter and buried three feet under ground. the utility company, pacific gas and electric, says it is still too hot to get close. but as we said, neighbors say they knew something was wrong. mike von fremd has that part of the story. >> reporter: investigators won't know what caused this disaster until it is safe to approach the site of the blast. >> we have yet to be able to get close enough to the actual source to be able to determine exactly why this happened. >> reporter: here's what
nation." the conferences going on all day here. secretary of education arne duncan will join us this half hour. i'm chuck todd. >> good morning. i'm savannah guthrie. let's get to the rundown. at the top for us, the top love message out of the white house. first vice president biden telling progressives, stop whining. now the president in a new interview out this morning says it is inexcusable and irresponsible for them to sit out the midterms. in "rolling stone" the president says there may be complaints about us not having gotten certain things done, not fast enough, not making certain legislative compromises but he goes on to say if people want to take their ball and go home, that tells me folks weren't serious in the first place. in the meantime, the vice president on with lawrence o'donnell last night explained those whiner comments. >> there's some on the democratic base, not the core of it, that are angry because we didn't get every single thing they want. it's time to just buck up here, understand that we can make things better. continue to move forward. >> the president, meanwhil
why? what would you do? 360 md sanjay gupta introduces us to the "the disease detectives" solving medicine's toughest mysteries. this is part one 06 a week-long series. we begin "keeping them honest" with christine o'donnell and how she spent money. last week after searching, we learned that the nominee from u.s. senator from delaware had checks and expense records that didn't seem to add up, apparently spending campaign money on personal expenses after the campaign was over which would be a violation of federal election law. for instance, take a look. this check for $475, mrs. o'donnell labeled it for mileage reimbursement but written three months after her last campaign ended. or $600 for her utility bill, paid to delmarva power. again, the campaign was over. more checks have surfaced including campaign money paying for her home and money going to the her former boyfriend who bought the home when she couldn't make the payments. ms. o'donnell said she hadn't done anything unethical. she's not talking. you'll see what happened when gary tuckman tried to talk to her. this weekend s
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